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Frances, 2nd Year

Dr Corinna Russell

Photo of Dr Corinna Russell

MA, PhD

Official Fellow; Tutor for Admissions in Arts; Tutor; Director of Studies in English
College Lecturer in English

Corinna Russell took up her post in 2002. She studied for her BA at New Hall, Cambridge, and for her PhD, on genre and ‘the ethics of response’ in Romantic Period literature, at Jesus College, Cambridge. She spent two years lecturing at Liverpool University before joining the Fellowship at Emmanuel. Teaching and Research Dr Russell’s teaching in the English Tripos is primarily in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, and especially the literature associated with the Romantic movement in British culture. She teaches widely for the Part I paper on ‘Literature and its Contexts, 1688-1847’, and the Part II paper on Lyric, as well as Literary Criticism, and some aspects of Victorian literature and Shakespeare. She is currently lecturing in the Faculty of English on ‘The Poetics of the Nineteenth-Century Novel’, ‘Romanticism and Repetition’, and Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Recent graduate teaching at MPhil and doctoral level has covered various aspects of eighteenth-century, Romantic Period and early Victorian literature and culture. Authors of particular interest include: Byron, Keats, Dickens, Wordsworth, Hazlitt. Areas of special interest include: all aspects of Romantic poetry and poetics; narratology; interdisciplinary readings (literature and visual culture, music, theology and philosophy); genre, style and form; reading and response. Corinna Russell’s current research interests centre on all forms of repetition across the representational arts in the Romantic period: tautology and redundancy in poetic diction; iteration and iterability in narrative style; habit and ritual in Romantic accounts of the everyday; repetitive practice and the discourse of craft in poetry and the visual arts; the reproducibility of visual, musical and quotidian experience in the verbal arts. For a list of publications please see Dr Russell’s entry on the Faculty of English website.


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